Art Resources Library - General information about - Printmaking, Acrylic Painting Techniques, Pastels Drawing, Oil Painting, Giclee Print, Photography Print, Canvas and more. You can find these articles on wikipedia.org also, but we did the search and put them all together in one place for you.

Printmaking Oil Painting Acrylic Painting Techniques Pastel Giclee Prints Photographic Prints Canvas

Contemporary Art Impressionism Landscape Art Nature Photography

Printmaking Techniques-
Printmaking is the process of making artworks by printing, normally on paper. Except in the case of monotyping, the process is capable of producing multiples of the same piece, which is called a print. Each piece is not a copy but an original since it is not a reproduction of another work of art and is technically known as an impression. Painting or drawing, on the other hand, create a unique original piece of artwork. Prints are created from a single original surface, known technically as a matrix. Common types of matrices include: plates of metal, usually copper or zinc for engraving or etching; stone, used for lithography; blocks of wood for woodcuts, linoleum for linocuts and fabric plates for screen-printing. But there are many other kinds, discussed below. Works printed from a single plate create an edition, in modern times usually each signed and numbered to form a limited edition. Prints may also be published in book form, as artist's books. A single print could be the product of one or multiple techniques. Read more about printmaking here - Techniques, Woodcut, Engraving, Etching, Mezzotint, Aquatint, Drypoint, Lithography, Screen-printing, Digital prints, Foil imaging, Color and Protective equipment.


Oil Painting -
Oil painting is the process of painting with pigments that are bound with a medium of drying oil - especially in early modern Europe, linseed oil. Often an oil such as linseed was boiled with a resin such as pine resin or even frankincense; these were called 'varnishes' and were prized for their body and gloss. Other oils occasionally used include poppyseed oil, walnut oil, and safflower oil. These oils confer various properties to the oil paint, such as less yellowing or different drying times. Certain differences are also visible in the sheen of the paints depending on the oil. Painters often use different oils in the same painting depending on specific pigments and effects desired. The paints themselves also develop a particular feel depending on the medium. Read more about oil painting here - Oil painting, Oil paint, Techniques, History, Ingredients, Carriers and Process of oil painting.

Acrylic painting techniques -
Acrylic painting techniques are different styles of manipulating and working with polymer-based acrylic paints. Acrylics differ from oil paints in that they have shorter drying times (as little as 10 minutes) and are soluble in water. These types of paint eliminate the need for turpentine and gesso, and can be applied directly onto canvas. Aside from painting with concentrated color paints, acrylics can also be watered down to a consistency that can be poured or used for glazing. Read more about Acrylic painting techniques here - Acrylic painting techniques, Preventing paint from drying out, Creating fluid paints, Painting glazes and Pouring paints.

Pastel -
Pastel is an art medium in the form of a stick, consisting of pure powdered pigment and a binder. The pigments used in pastels are the same as those used to produce all colored art media, including oil paints; the binder is of a neutral hue and low saturation. The noun "pastel" gives rise to:
  • another noun, for an artwork whose medium is pastels
  • a verb, meaning to produce an artwork with pastels
  • an adjective, meaning pale in color.
Read more about Pastel here - Pastel, Pastel media, Manufacture, Pastel supports, Protection of pastel artworks, Pastel societies and Pastel art in art history.

Giclee Prints -
Giclee (pronounced "zhee-clay") is an invented name (i.e. a neologism) for the process of making fine art prints from a digital source using ink-jet printing. The word "giclée" is derived from the French language word "le gicleur" meaning "nozzle", or more specifically "gicler" meaning "to squirt, spurt, or spray". It was coined in 1991 by Jack Duganne, a printmaker working in the field, to represent any inkjet-based digital print used as fine art. The intent of that name was to distinguish commonly known industrial "Iris proofs" from the type of fine art prints artists were producing on those same types of printers. The name was originally applied to fine art prints created on Iris printers in a process invented in the early 1990s but has since come to mean any high quality ink-jet print and is often used in galleries and print shops to denote such prints. Read more about Giclee Prints here - Giclee, Origins, Current usage and Applications.

Photography Prints / Photographic Prints -
Photography Prints / Photographic Prints is the process of producing a final image on paper for viewing, using chemically sensitized paper. The paper is exposed to a photographic negative, a positive transparency (or slide), or a digital image file projected using an enlarger or digital exposure unit such as a LightJet printer. Alternatively, the negative or transparency may be placed atop the paper and directly exposed, creating a contact print. Read more about Photographic Prints here - Photographic printing Printing on black-and-white paper Printing on color paper Printing from a Slide or Transparency Printing from a Digital image.


Canvas -
Canvas is an extremely heavy-duty plain-woven fabric used for making sails, tents, marquees, backpacks, and other functions where sturdiness is required. It is also popularly used as a painting surface, typically stretched, and on fashion handbags and shoes. Read more about Physical characteristics, Canvas for painting, Splined canvas, stretched canvas and canvas boards.


Contemporary Art -
Contemporary art can be defined variously as art produced at this present point in time or art produced since World War II. The definition of the word contemporary would support the first view, but museums of contemporary art commonly define their collections as consisting of art produced since World War II. Read more about Contemporary art, The institutions of contemporary art, Public attitudes and Concerns.


Impressionism -
Impressionism was a 19th-century art movement that began as a loose association of Paris-based artists exhibiting their art publicly in the 1860s. The name of the movement is derived from the title of a Claude Monet work, Impression, Sunrise (Impression, soleil levant), which provoked the critic Louis Leroy to coin the term in a satiric review published in Le Charivari.

Characteristics of Impressionist paintings include visible brush strokes, open composition, emphasis on light in its changing qualities (often accentuating the effects of the passage of time), ordinary subject matter, the inclusion of movement as a crucial element of human perception and experience, and unusual visual angles...Read more about Impressionism, Overview, Beginnings, Impressionist techniques, Content and composition, Associates and influenced artists, Music and literature and Post-Impressionism.


Landscape Art -
Landscape art depicts scenery such as mountains, valleys, trees, rivers, and forests. Sky is almost always included in the view, and weather usually is an element of the composition. In the first century A.D., Roman frescoes of landscapes decorated rooms that have been preserved at Pompeii and Herculaneum. Traditionally, landscape art depicts the surface of the earth, but there are other sorts of landscapes, such as moonscapes.

The word landscape is from the Dutch, landschap meaning a sheaf, a patch of cultivated ground. The word entered the English vocabulary of the connoisseur in the late 17th century...Read more about Landscape Art, Cityscape, Riverscape, Seascape, Moonscape, Skyscape, Hardscape, etc...


Nature Photography -
Nature photography refers to a wide range of photography taken outdoors and devoted to displaying natural elements such as landscapes (See Landscape Photography), wildlife, plants, and close-ups of natural scenes and textures. Nature photography tends to put a stronger emphasis on the aesthetic value of the photo than other photography genres, such as photojournalism and documentary photography...Read more about Nature photography, Wildlife Photography, Macro / Texture Photography, Use of Color and Ethics.